Greenest Park Icon 2014

Greenest Park

The Yellowstone Park Foundation supports projects that reduce Yellowstone's ecological footprint, increase operational efficiency, and better preserve environmental resources.

 

Propane Canister Recycling Unit

Propane Canister Recycling Unit

In 2004, the Park partnered with the Yellowstone Park Foundation and several other public and private entities to create the world's first unit to recycle small propane canisters used in camp stoves and lanterns. The device safely prepares used propane gas canisters for recycling and is powered by residual gas found in each propane cylinder. To date, it’s been used to recycle more than 20,000 propane canisters and the program has now been adopted by other national parks, state parks, and nationwide municipalities.

 

Hybrids for the Park's Fleet

Hybrids for the Park's Fleet

In summer of 2004, Toyota Motor Sales, USA donated four Prius hybrid vehicles to the Yellowstone Park Foundation. The Prius hybrid uses much less fuel and has 90% lower emissions than average cars. These vehicles are driven throughout Yellowstone National Park by interpretive rangers and Park staff who interact with the public. Use of the vehicles also raises awareness among Yellowstone's visitors about hybrid technology and the Park's commitment to explore innovative technologies to better protect, manage, and preserve natural resources. This Prius donation was the beginning of a long-term partnership between Toyota and YPF that has included, in addition to cash support, the donation of other hybrid models including the Camry and Highlander.

 

Dark Skies - Fort Yellowstone Area

Dark Skies - Fort Yellowstone Area

The night sky is one of Yellowstone's precious resources. However, light pollution from the Park's developed area brightens Yellowstone's night sky, diminishing the "Yellowstone experience" for visitors. Beginning in 2003 with night-lighting research, Park staff discovered that improving Yellowstone's current outdoor lighting system required more than replacing light bulbs. Lighting standards dictate that fixtures must direct light downward, be energy efficient, and consistent with Yellowstone's historic character. With support from the Yellowstone Park Foundation, the Park designed and installed fixtures to correct light pollution in the Old Faithful and Lake Hotel areas. Recently, they expanded efforts to the historic Fort Yellowstone area of Mammoth Hot Springs, correcting outdoor lighting issues that include new, historically relevant fixtures that reduce both energy use and enhance stargazing.

Learn about the history of Fort Yellowstone